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dentistryPeriodontal disease (gum and tooth disease) can cause great discomfort and pain in our four legged friends - and can lead to even greater health concerns.dogs teeth

Dentistry

Dental (tooth) disease is one of the most frequently occurring clinical condition in pets seen by vets. It is estimated that 4 out of 5 of those over the age of 3 showing evidence of being affected.

Periodontal disease (gum and tooth disease) can cause great discomfort and pain in our four legged friends - and can lead to even greater health concerns.

There is evidence that dental disease contributes to disease in other body systems too, therefore affecting our pets’ general health. Pets often continue to eat and act normally even with severe dental disease.

That’s why a dental check is an essential part of any clinical examination.

The Vet's Cat Goes to the Vet! - View above

Ruadh, our 2 1/2 year old cat broke a canine tooth (fang). Some people think because a pet continues to eat and drink, they are not in pain. Imagine how you would feel if this happened to you! Just because Ruadh couldn't pick up the phone and book a dental appointment does not mean this didn't hurt!
3 salutory lessons from Ruadh's tale: Fractured teeth should be dealt with appropriately and quickly - waiting to see prolongs any pain and discomfort; We are very lucky in Scotland to have an extremely highly qualified and skilled veterinary dentist within an hour and a half drive. Pet Insurance is invaluable for incidents like this!

(Photos by Norman Johnston, BVM&S, Dipl.AVDC, Dipl.EVDC, MRCVS, RCVS, American & European Specialist in Veterinary Dentistry, DentalVets, North Berwick.)

Brushing your pet's teeth - video by Norman Johnston-BVM&S,Dipl.AVDC,
Dipl.EVDC, MRCVS, RCVS, American & European Specialist in Veterinary Dentistry


A LIFETIME OF CARING FOR YOUR PET